An analysis of socrates claim of the immortality of the soul in platos phaedo

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An analysis of socrates claim of the immortality of the soul in platos phaedo

The narration takes place at Phlius, a town of Sicyon.

SparkNotes: Phaedo: Overall Analysis and Themes

The dialog takes the form of a narrative because Socrates is described acting as well as speaking, and the particulars of the event are interesting to distant friends as well as to the narrator himself.

Phaedo is asked if he had been present with Socrates on the day that he drank the poison. He replies that he was present, and he also mentions several of the other persons who were there at the time. These included Simmias, Cebes, Crito, Apollodorus, and several other people.

Plato was not present at this meeting, having been kept away because of illness. Inasmuch as all of those present were aware of the fact that Socrates would be put to death that day, they wanted to know what their beloved teacher believed concerning the nature of the soul.

There were many questions that they would like to have answered, including: What assurance or proof do we have that souls actually exist?

An analysis of socrates claim of the immortality of the soul in platos phaedo

How is the soul related to the body? What happens to the soul at the time of death? Does it disintegrate into nothingness, or does it continue to exist in some form? Are souls immortal in the sense that they have neither a beginning nor an end?

Are souls influenced by contact with the body? Are there both good and bad souls, and if so, what constitutes the difference between them? Are souls either punished or rewarded in some future life? These questions, along with others closely related to them, are discussed at some length as Socrates attempts to present his ideas in a manner that is both clear and convincing.

Plato: Phaedo | Internet Encyclopedia of Philosophy

The dialog begins with a request that Phaedo report to the group of visitors about the death of Socrates, telling them what he had to say during his last hours. Some of those who were present had heard that Socrates had been condemned to drink poison, but they knew very little about it and were anxious to learn more of the details.

Phaedo explained the reason why the execution had been delayed for a month, pending the return of the ship from the island of Delos. He also described something of his own feelings as he witnessed the death of his very dear friend.

He did not pity Socrates, for his mien and his language were so noble and fearless in the hour of death that he appeared to be blessed. As the group entered the prison on the morning of Socrates last day, they observed that he had just been released from chains.

His wife, Xanthippe, was sitting by him, holding their child in her arms. She was weeping because this was the last time she could converse with her husband.

Socrates turned to Crito and asked that he have someone take her home.

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After this had been done and some remarks had been made concerning the readiness with which a true philosopher would approach death, Cebes asks Socrates why it is that he believes it is wrong for one to commit suicide since death is not something to be feared?Plato: Phaedo The Phaedo is one of the most widely read dialogues written by the ancient Greek philosopher Plato.

It claims to recount the events and conversations that occurred on the day that Plato’s teacher, Socrates ( B.C.E.), was put to . Forms of Love in Plato's Symposium - Love, in classical Greek literature, is commonly considered as a prominent theme.

Love, in present days, always appears in the categories of books, movies or music, etc. Interpreted differently by different people, Love turns into a multi-faceted being. Plato is one of the world's best known and most widely read and studied philosophers.

He was the student of Socrates and the teacher of Aristotle, and he wrote in the middle of the fourth century B.C.E.

in ancient Greece. Though influenced primarily by Socrates, to the extent that Socrates is. Dao Le Prof. Mark Cronin HU - HD April 2, The Immortality of the Soul in Plato’s Phaedo Among Plato’s dialogues, which serve to honor the realm of philosophy in general and Socrates’s life in particular, the Phaedo dramatically and poignantly portrays the death scene of Socrates.

An encyclopedia of philosophy articles written by professional philosophers.

Plato was a philosopher during the 5th century BCE. He was a student of Socrates and later taught r-bridal.com founded the Academy, an academic program which many consider to be the first Western r-bridal.com wrote many philosophical texts—at least He dedicated his life to learning and teaching and is hailed as one of the founders of Western philosophy.

Overall Analysis and Themes. The Phaedo stands alongside the Republic as the most philosophically dense dialogue of Plato's middle period. It contains the first extended discussion of the Theory of Forms, four arguments for the immortality of the soul, and strong arguments in favor of the philosophical life.

Plato | Life, Philosophy, & Works | r-bridal.com